Women Underwater

A comprehensive resource for women divers.

THE AUTHORS

JILL HEINERTH – A pioneering underwater explorer, Jill Heinerth has dived deeper into caves than any woman in history. Selected for the inaugural class of the Women Divers Hall of Fame, her recent awards include the Wyland Icon and Scuba Diving Magazine’s Sea Hero of the Year. Recognizing a lifetime of contributions to advancing underwater exploration, in 2013, Jill was presented with the Sir Christopher Ondaatje Medal for Exploration by the Royal Canadian Geographic Society. The author of several books about diving Jill currently has two titles on Amazon.com’s extreme sports “Top 100” bestseller charts. She is an active filmmaker, author, a regular Diver Magazine columnist and a highly regarded technical diving instructor. Her company, Heinerth Productions, Inc. specializes in independent publishing, new media content creation, and underwater videography. Jill Heinerth’s professional credentials includes PADI CCR Trimix Instructor Trainer in addition to teaching for several rebreather and cave diving agencies.

 

RENEE POWER – Since 1994 Renee Power has participated in dozens of underwater research projects and public education outreach efforts with the Cambrian Foundation. With the Foundation dive team, she has explored and surveyed thousands of feet of new passages in Mexico and Florida caves. Renee is an active NSS-CDS Basic Cave Instructor as well as a PADI Master Instructor. She served as Expedition Dive Safety Officer for projects in Bermuda and Florida, designing detailed safety and evacuation protocols specific to those regions. Renee is an active PADI Master Instructor. Her technical training certifications include Full Cave, Trimix and the Prism Topaz Closed Circuit Rebreather. Renee is a Disabled Diver International Instructor and has served in the Deptherapy Program with wounded military veterans. Her favorite students are the ones she helps empower to overcome their greatest challenges, obstacles and fears.

Bailout Bottle Trim for Rebreathers

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A Lesson from Sidemount Divers

Stages1373l

Sidemount diving has taken the diving community by storm. The popularity of this style of carrying tanks has grown tenfold in the last few years. Now rebreather divers are taking a lesson from sidemount divers to help them streamline their bailout bottles. Standard stage rigging generally hangs bailout tanks nearly perpendicular to the diver’ s body. This is neither streamlined nor conservation-minded. It is far more effective to mount your tanks in a way that aligns them with your body. There are numerous ways to achieve this, but here are two simple solutions:

1. Use your SMS 75 or SMS100 sidemount harness on your rebreather.

SideBungeeKnot9054l2. Make your own simple sidemount bungees: – Take a length of heavy bungee cord (approximately 18 inches) and place a knot in one end. – Thread the bungee cord through a hole in the backplate of your rebreather. Use a hole on the edge of the plate, halfway down or roughly below your scapula. The knot should be on the back side of the plate so it does not press into your shoulder or back.

3. Loop the free end of the bungee through the ring of a small bolt snap or other type of clip and secure it to the clip with two zip ties.

4. Clip to the lowest shoulder D-ring on your harness.

5. Place a butterfly D-ring on your crotch strap or use a butt plate (as shown in the photo) for the lower tank attachment point.

6. Mount the lower bailout bottle clip on the tank roughly 180° opposite from the tank valve hand wheel.SideBungee9055l

7. Use the bungee to snug the tank close to the body by looping it over the tank valve so the tank tucks into your armpit region.

8. Move the knot to shorten or lengthen the bungee and adjust for size.

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Women Underwater on Planet Earth Diver

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Brian Hurricane Smith interviews Jill Heinerth about her new book, Women Underwater which she co-authored with Reneé Power. Heinerth describes  why they felt the need to write a gender specific scuba manual. Listen to the podcast here.

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What’s Your Adventure?

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I’m very proud to be featured in Suunto’s new adventure video!

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Get Shot in North Florida

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There are few things I love more than shooting people… underwater! When I am home in North Florida by the crystalline underwater springs, I love to arrange private photo experiences for interested divers or teams. For some people, it is a chance to learn more about underwater photography. For others, it gives them a beautiful portfolio of shots to share with friends. I also arrange to shoot professional video content for teams and individuals who want some HD footage they will treasure.CasPeanut*0225l

I can accommodate teams of up to three divers in the cave and more if we are shooting in open water. On the first dive, I’ll get you acquainted with the photographic process while concentrating on portrait type shots. On the second dive we get a little more adventurous and travel further with you not only acting as the model, but also as a lighting assistant. It’s a fun day of interesting diving and I guarantee your satisfaction with the final results. After a couple of days of editing on my part, I’ll upload a portfolio of high resolution images to DropBox so that you can download all the original files. I can offer advice on where you can get great quality prints for your wall or other merchandise with your photo’s printed on the surface. You’ll be able to share the work online, make prints, and use the images on you website. Essentially, you can do anything you like with the exception of selling the shots (that can be arranged through commercial shoot). If you are interested, I will also use the shots in magazine articles and books with your permission.P1tunnel0096l

Drop me note if you are interested! JillHeinerth@mac.com

 

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Rosemary Lunn Takes on Rebreather Diving

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Women Underwater reached out to dive professional Rosemary Lunn of The Underwater Marketing Company to ask about challenges in learning how to dive a new rebreather. She offers some personal experiences and candid advice for others who want to take the plunge.

Rosemary Lunn:

My greatest challenge with equipment has got to be with rebreathers. I seem to be fortunate to be in the right place at the right time on many occasions when it came to rebreathers. I have a definate love / hate relationship with this piece of kit.

My first rebreather dive was in Stoney Cove in 1996 on a Drager Dolphin. It may seem hard to imagine now, but at that time rebreathers were rarely, if ever seen by recreational divers. Technical divers were all diving doubles / twins. Depending on which training agency you listened to, nitrox was considered a technical or voodoo / devil gas; and the first mass produced rebreather, the Inspiration, was still on the drawing board. The only people with access to rebreathers were the military for covert opreations, therfore you never saw them. A lot of heads turned as I walked down the car park to the water, as everyone oggled the Drager Dolphin.

Rosemary Lunn at InnerSpace in Grand Cayman. Photo: Courtesy of Peter Den Haan

Rosemary Lunn at InnerSpace in Grand Cayman. Photo: Courtesy of Peter Den Haan

I think it is fair to say that Drager created a game changer when they launched the Dolphin. A few years later they followed it up with the ill-fated Drager Ray. This was a 22 metre rated semi-closed recreational rebreather and was to pay a part in my rebreather education. It was one of those ‘right place, right time’ moments again. I was offered the chance of working for Drager Dive and given 24 hours notice to leave the UK and join the team. My boyfriend at the time gave me the choice of him or Drager. I cried all the way down to Dover. How could I turn up an opportunity like this? I spent the summer of 1999 as part of an international team taking divers diving on rebreathers all over Europe. It was an amazing job. I remember ringing my Mum with the news I had the job and saying “it was better than winning the lottery!”. Money could not buy this job.

When we were not travelling to incredible destinations in Holland, France, Spain, Italy, etc, we were diving. We stayed in everything from grand luxury hotels to wooden bunks in basic huts. We lived on chocolate, diet coke and listened to Cher’s ‘Believe’ album on repeat for three months. We spent our days building and checking units; going diving; and then cleaning and packing up units. I was in 7th heaven. Until the one day I was task loaded. The one day I made a mistake. It was my own stupid fault. I built and carefully check 12 Rays and then ran out of time to get my unit ready. I slung my Dolphin together. I thought I’d tightened down the scrubber canister properly. I hadn’t.

I took a caustic cocktail at 20 metres. It felt as though someone had poured liquid concrete down my throat and it had instantly set and changed into a steel scaffolding bar. My esophagus was rigid from throat to stomach. I was very lucky I’d ingested it, not breathed it in. At the time I didn’t know this. I must admit I was quite scared and not happy wondering just how badly I had damaged my lungs. (I hadn’t). I was escorting a pair of diving professionals whose idea of buddy diving was ‘same ocean, same day’. Trying to get them to dive in roughly the same area, let alone surface because I’d taken a cocktail, was hard work. The cocktail hospitalised me and destroyed my confidence in this amazing technology in one stroke. It took years to rebuilt my confidence.

Rebreathers are an amazing tool. They have opened up exploration and enabled certain dives to take place that would have been impossible on open circuit. Not everyone should be diving them however. You need a certain mindset and attitude and you need to dive them regularly. They require the three “C’s”. Checks, care and concentration.

Time passed and I did some training on a couple of other units, but I never trusted them. I couldn’t relax. And I have never really had a head or natural feel for maths. So when I checked my handsets I wasn’t always confident it was safe or about to kill me. I have lost too many friends and colleagues diving on rebreathers, so my first thought was, “so when are you going to kill me then”?

Photo of Rosemary Lunn by Karl Shreeves

Although I have not got hundreds of hours of diving time on rebreathers, I have a fair knowledge of them. I found this invaluable when I was asked to organise the logistics on an international safety conference called ‘Rebreather Forum 3′. This three day event took 3 years of development and organisation, and two years of editing the proceedings. The proceedings and a number of lectures are available online, for free, for anyone who wants to access them. If you have any interest in rebreathers then check out www.rf30.org.

It wasn’t until 2013 when I was working the renowned “Inner Space” week hosted and organised by Divetech in Grand Cayman, that I finally began to get my mojo back for breathers. I was fortunate enough to be trained by Matthew Addison on the Hollis Explorer. If truth be told I had no idea why Hollis had gone down the line of developing and building a recreational unit. There was so much choice in the market place, why on earth would you want to dive an Explorer? My head turned 180 degrees during my training. This unit was basic. This unit was simple. Above all this unit was fun! Even I could understand it. And now I see its place. If you want to get into rebreathers, this is a useful unit to learn how to dive one, and how to become disciplined in your checks, care and concentration.

Twelve months later I wanted to expand my rebreather education and trained on the Poseidon Mark VI with Steve Newman. My courage and my mojo returned in spades. I fell in love with the unit. This too was fun. This too was simple. But what this had over the Explorer was it had legs. Whereas the Explorer is a recreational breather and so therefore limited, the Poseidon is a marmite unit. “The growing up spread you never grow out of”. As your diving develops, so does this unit’s capability. I like the fact that one day I will be able to take it trimix diving and to technical depths. Am I cautious when I dive it? Yes. Do I respect it? Yes. Am I happy and relaxed diving this? Yes. It has taken me 15 years to find the rebreather I want to have a long term relationship with. Today I am proud to say I am an ambassador for Poseidon Rebreathers.

The moral of the tail. If you are interested in getting into rebreather diving, and you find that one unit is not to your liking, there is choice out there. You may well find that another unit suits your diving, and you too will fall in love with this extraordinary piece of technology.

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Women Underwater Available Now!

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Our first shipment of books just arrived and are now available for order. This first batch of 40 will be signed by both authors! We can’t always get together for signing, so these will be special! We met on the side of the road and signed them in the back of my 1996 Volvo! Book Signing0246

We’ve built on the work of others and want to recognize some of the great people that helped make Women Underwater possible.

In 1979, Susan Bangasser and Jeanne Bear Sleeper published the first book to specifically reach women divers. In 1992, Ella Jean Morgan and Erin O’Neill published When Women Dive. They were way ahead of their time. All inaugural inductees into the Women Divers Hall of Fame, they were true pioneers in our industry. Co-author Reneé Power and I are proud to  build on the foundation of these remarkable women.

In the late 1990s, my dear friend Patty Mortara and I were lamenting the lack of resources for and connections between the very few female technical divers around the world. With Velora Peacock, we started an organization called Cardea 2000, in the hopes that we could better connect women tec divers around the world by the turn of the century. Patty and I started a magazine called Women Underwater in order to further that cause. Edited and printed in small numbers the quarterly was mailed out around the world until we ran out of money to do it. We shared stories about expeditions, gear and  resources with our growing community of women technical divers. I knew one day I would dust off the concept and this book is very much the result of that desire.

WOMENcoverReneé and I would like to thank the many people, organizations and manufacturers who assisted this project with loans and gifts of equipment, donation of charters and volunteer support. Specifically, we would like to thank Dr. Maida Taylor for incredible support and research, and Santi Diving, who provided Reneé with a drysuit when she really needed it and who continue to support my work generously. We would also like to thank: Amigos Dive Center, Aqualung, Ken Charlesworth, Cobalt Coast Dive Resort, DiveRite, DiveSangha, Divetech and InDepth Watersports in Grand Cayman, Halcyon, Bob and Sylvia Ledbetter, Light & Motion, Peter Skop Industries (PSI), Rick’s Dive ‘N Travel, SCUBA-Blog.com, Seminole SCUBA, and Suunto.

This book was carefully proofed and edited by Kristine Rae Olmsted. It is an enormous task and we truly appreciate her talent, support and guidance in bringing this to fruition.

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Death of the Canister Light

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My first primary light for cave diving was so heavy I had to mount it on two large D-rings and hang it from the bottom of my tanks. The bulky rectangular housing concealed two large sealed lead acid batteries. A hefty cord lead to a metal light head that could double as a sledgehammer. One day it switched on in the van and burned a hole in the carpet before I could get it shut off. I used to wait to the very last moment possible before turning the light on, well into the cavern zone, trying to save every last minute of burn time for the dive at hand. SolaTech6000249

In the last two decades of technical diving, lights have changed more than anything else. They’ve shrunk. The battery technology has improved and burn times are extended. Even my backup lights are now far brighter and reliable than my earliest primary light. We’ve switched from incandescent bulbs to HID, HMI, and LED. We moved through lead acid to nickel metal hydride and now lithium batteries. Yet, for some reason, divers still have a hard time letting go of that antiquated canister and cord.

I’m not one to point fingers, because it took until early this year when I finally dropped the canister in favor of a powerful handheld – the Light & Motion Sola Tech600. I had tried other handhelds, but they were still large, negatively buoyant lights equipped with clunky high profile handles. They lacked the elegance, comfort and streamlining necessary to convince me. After researching lighting technology for an article I wrote for DIVER magazine, I stepped into some Light & Motion gear and wondered why I had waited so long. Free from a canister and cord, my rig is more streamlined, my hands more nimble and luggage weight is cut substantially. The beam (check out their beam comparisons) offers the perfect balance between a great signaling light and excellent coverage. The Tech600 fulfills a solid day of diving and yet I can easily recharge it in 75 minutes over lunch if I want to. With three power settings that are arguably brilliant, I can conserve power when needed. It also gives me peace of mind seeing small LED fuel gauges that confirm I have plenty of power left to finish the day of diving.

When it comes to travel, it is a no brainer. I can’t break it and neither can the airlines (I don’t know which of us is worse). The light can be switched into an airline safe lockout. The package with the charger is minuscule and light. More importantly, it is not intimidating to the Transportation Safety Authority (TSA) guards who squirm at the x-ray machine and set off lights and buzzers when viewing canister lights in your bags.

P1tunnel0096lI’m a convert. After watching others use these elegant lights, I reached out to Light & Motion and now I own most of the products they make.

So if you are still tethered to a canister, it is time to break the umbilical and move into the next generation. Try a Sola Tech600 and I guarantee you’ll never go back.

Jill Heinerth, Explorer

www.IntoThePlanet.com

PS – Ladies and small hands: Light & Motion makes two sizes of hand mount and also offers myriad mounting options from D-ring to T-handle to a new Goodman style handle adapter.

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Earth’s Changes in Surprising Ways as Ice Melts

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FEB1JILLThis article in the Daily Beast confirms a simple truth. As we lose large areas of ice cover, the earth changes in dramatic ways. When I wrote the movie Ice Island in 2000, I learned that the ice was so thick over Antarctic that is squeezed the earth into a slight pear shape. The large mass also affects gravity and as we shift mass around the planet by melting ice, there are documentable changes that are happening very quickly. The Daily Beast sums it up well.

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Women Mentors – Cristina Zenato

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cristinaCristina Zenato – Dive Trainer and Shark Handler

Cristina Zenato’s career qualifies her to be in the category of world’s most dangerous jobs. If handling wild sharks is not enough, she is also a recognized cave diving explorer and instructor. Yet although she operates in a decidedly male world, she places a high value on authenticity, tenacity and celebration of her femininity.

Cristina moved from Italy to the Bahamas in 1994 and decided to make it her home and diving her life. She manages a team of eighteen divers, teaches hundreds of students at all levels from Open Water to Full Cave and specializes in teaching a program on shark handling. While weighted down in a heavily armored chain mail suit, she gracefully coaxes a shark into a status of tonic immobility through gentle touch.  She explores and maps cave systems, providing the Bahamian government with vital information for natural resource protection and is the first woman to have connected a land cave with an ocean blue hole. She consults with organizations for the creation of marine parks with an emphasis on protecting sharks. Cristina believes there is great power in education and volunteers her time to host foreign students and teach local Bahamian school children to dive as part of sharing her vision.

One of the greatest challenges Cristina faces as a woman diver seeking equality is learning how to demonstrate strength and resilience without sacrificing her femininity.  Uniquely connecting well with both women and men students has been rewarding to Cristina.

Cristina has spent years fighting with dive gear that did not fit. Instead of it working for her, she felt overpowered by it. She had to find unique solutions especially with her drysuit and sidemount harness.  In the most recent years those issues have been resolved and now she has gear to suit her body size.

She recalls an awkward moment years ago when she was in a grocery store with a visibly older cave diving colleague. He was buying adult diapers and lubricating jelly for his drysuit seals. “The facial expression of the cashier was priceless!”

With the increase of women in our sport it is evident that we need equipment that both fits and performs. Fortunately, the attitude that women are inferior and weak seems to be declining.. Cristina Zenato believes that women can be strong and feminine at the same time. This new perception is exemplified by her lifestyle, career and passion for the environment that screams, “Be who you are!”

- Renee Power

Read more about other women mentors in “Women Underwater” which will be released November 1, 2014

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Women Divers Hall of Fame 2015 Scholarships and Grants

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DEADLINE FOR 2015 WOMEN DIVERS HALL OF FAME SCHOLARSHIPS AND TRAINING GRANTS IS NOVEMBER 28, 2014
 
The Women Divers Hall of Fame™ (WDHOF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization dedicated to honoring and raising awareness of the contributions of outstanding women divers. WDHOF provides educational, mentorship, financial, and career opportunities to the diving community throughout the world. Each year, WDHOF awards scholarships and training grants that provide financial and educational support to individuals of all ages, particularly those who are preparing for professional careers that involve diving. 
 
Scholarships are offered in conservation, marine biology, underwater archaeology, and journalism, graphic arts, or photography. They are intended to support tuition and fees, independent research, and/or an internship program at an accredited university. Scholarships are paid directly to the recipient. 
 
Training grants provide funding for scuba training and, for some awards, scuba equipment. Funds are paid directly to the training facility and/or the equipment vendor upon WDHOF’s receipt of an invoice; they are NOT paid directly to the grantee.
 
 
SCHOLARSHIPS 
 
NEW THIS YEAR!!!  WDHOF SCHOLARSHIP IN MARINE OR UNDERWATER EDUCATION
A $2,000 scholarship will be awarded to a qualified woman of any age to plan and conduct an education project in marine or underwater STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) programs for students in grades K-12. The scholarship may also be used to support independent research by an educator in any underwater STEM area. Applicants should hold a degree (or equivalent certificate) in education, museum studies, or other relevant area, and have experience teaching marine science, technology, or engineering at any K-12 level.
 
NEW THIS YEAR!!!  WDHOF/LIFEGUARD SYSTEMS PUBLIC SAFETY DIVING SCHOLARSHIP
A scholarship to take an unlimited number of any Lifeguard Systems open, Levels 1-3, public safety and water rescue certification training programs for a duration of one year will be awarded to a woman 18 years of age or older, with a commitment to public safety diving and water rescue, and preferably some experience in public safety (e.g., EMT certification, volunteer firefighter, in law enforcement, forensics, etc.). The awardee might be able to stay in the host’s facility (e.g., fire department) at no cost, if such an option is available. Applicants must be certified to dive, have their own dive gear, and must be capable of getting to and from the training programs. The recipient will most likely also be able to take additional training programs from at least one other water rescue/recovery training agency.
 
WDHOF / AGGRESSOR AND DANCER FLEET GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP IN MARINE CONSERVATION
A $2,000 scholarship will be awarded to a qualified woman of any age who is enrolled in an accredited GRADUATE academic or research program in the field of marine conservation. The scholarship is intended to assist with college tuition/fees or may be used to support independent research or an internship program at an accredited university.
 
WDHOF / CECELIA CONNELLY MEMORIAL GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP IN UNDERWATER ARCHAEOLOGY, sponsored by the Connelly family
A $2,000 scholarship will be awarded to a deserving woman graduate student. Applicants must be enrolled in an accredited course of study in the field of underwater archaeology. The scholarship is intended to assist with college tuition/fees or field study costs and is open to candidates worldwide. A GPA of 3.0 or better is required, and the applicant must be in good standing with her academic institution. First year graduate students may submit verification of a minimum overall GPA of 2.5 from their final year as an undergraduate. There is no applicant age limit.
 
WDHOF / CECELIA CONNELLY MEMORIAL UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP IN UNDERWATER ARCHAEOLOGY, sponsored by the Connelly family
A $750 scholarship will be awarded to a deserving woman undergraduate student. Applicants must be enrolled in an accredited course of study in the field of underwater archaeology. The scholarship is intended to assist with college tuition/fees or field study costs and is open to candidates worldwide. An overall GPA of 2.5 or better is required and the applicant must be in good standing with her academic institution. There is no applicant age limit.
 
WDHOF / ELIZABETH GREENHALGH MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP IN JOURNALISM, GRAPHIC ARTS, OR PHOTOGRAPHY, sponsored by Deb Greenhalgh
A $1,500 scholarship will be awarded to a woman diver who is furthering her education beyond high school in the field of journalism, graphic arts, or photography to better serve the ocean environment or ocean community. The scholarship is intended to assist with college tuition/fees or may be used to support an internship program at an accredited university.
 
WDHOF UNDERGRADUATE MARINE RESEARCH INTERNSHIP IN MARINE BIOLOGY, sponsored by Sue Morra, Ph.D. and Kathleen Dudzinski, Ph.D.
A $1,000 scholarship will be awarded to a woman UNDERGRADUATE student who is (or will be) participating in an internship program with a focus in marine biology. Students must have completed at least 60 credits or hold third year (junior) status prior to starting the internship.
 
WDHOF UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP IN MARINE CONSERVATION, sponsored by Sherry A. Reed
A $1,000 scholarship will be awarded to a deserving UNDERGRADUATE woman who is enrolled in an accredited academic or research program in the field of marine conservation. Special consideration will be given to those women who are scuba certified. The scholarship is intended to assist with college tuition/fees or may be used to support independent research or an internship program at an accredited university.
 

TRAINING GRANTS 

WDHOF ADVANCED DIVE TRAINING GRANT sponsored by Bonnie Toth
A $1,000 training grant (up to $500 for training and up to $500 for dive equipment) will be awarded to a deserving woman diver of any age and background who wishes to further her dive education through an approved scuba diving program beyond the basic certification level. Up to $500 may be used for dive training, and up to $500 may be used for dive equipment. The recipient MUST use the funds for training BEFORE she uses the award to purchase dive equipment. When the recipient enrolls in an approved diving course/program and purchases dive equipment, the training facility/equipment vendor must send the invoice to WDHOF; funds are paid directly to the training facility/vendor, and not to the recipient.
 
WDHOF / AMELIA BEHRENS-FURNISS MEMORIAL HARDHAT TRAINING GRANT
A $1,000 grant will be awarded to a deserving woman diver of any age and background who wishes to begin or further her training in hardhat diving through an approved hardhat dive training program. The applicant should be enrolled in or attending a commercial dive school. Up to $1,000 may be used for dive training. When the recipient enrolls in an approved diving course/program, the training facility must send the invoice to WDHOF; funds are paid directly to the training facility, and not to the recipient.
 
NEW THIS YEAR!!!  WDHOF / CODE BLUE EDUCATION LTD DIVER MEDIC TRAINING GRANT
A $2000.00 training grant ($1275.00 for training and up to $725.00 for food and accommodations) will be awarded to a deserving male or female who wishes to further his/her diving training/education as a diver medic technician. The recipient must enroll in an approved Diver Medic Training facility with Code Blue Education Ltd in the United Kingdom. Upon successful completion of the Diver Medic Technician course, the recipient will be awarded a DAN or IMCA Diver Medical Technician certification. Applicants must be over the age of 18, have at least the recreational diver certification of Rescue Diver or equivalent, and should hold a current EFR/BLS/First Aid certification.

NEW THIS YEAR!!!  WDHOF / ELLA JEAN MORGAN MEMORIAL DIVE TRAINING GRANT
A $1,000 training grant will be awarded to a deserving young female, age 15-21, who wishes to begin her dive education/training. Up to $500 may be used for dive training, and up to $500 may be used for dive equipment. The recipient MUST use the funds for training BEFORE she uses the award to purchase dive equipment. An approved diving course must consist of at least 12 hours of classroom training, 12 hours of pool/confined-water training and at least 5 open-water dives and must culminate in a certification from a nationally recognized diver-training agency. When the recipient enrolls in an approved diving course/program and purchases dive equipment, the training facility/equipment vendor must send the invoice to WDHOF; funds are paid directly to the training facility/vendor, and not to the recipient.

WDHOF / HUGH FLETCHER MEMORIAL TRAINING GRANT TO ASSIST THE DISABLED TO DIVE
A $1,000 training grant (up to $500 for training and up to $500 for dive equipment) will be awarded to any disabled diver who wishes to pursue or further his/her dive education and purchase adaptive equipment, or to a dive master, assistant instructor, or instructor to gain the required education/training to assist or teach the disabled to dive. Candidates can be male or female. Up to $500 may be used for dive training, and up to $500 may be used for adaptive dive equipment. The recipient MUST use the funds for training BEFORE he/she uses the award to purchase adaptive dive equipment. When the recipient enrolls in an approved diving course/program and purchases adaptive dive equipment, the training facility/equipment vendor must send the invoice to WDHOF; funds are paid directly to the training facility/vendor, and not to the recipient.

WDHOF / KIDS SEA CAMP BASIC DIVE TRAINING GRANTS, sponsored by Margo Peyton
Two $500 training grants will be awarded to deserving women divers of any age and background who wish to begin their dive education through a PADI scuba certification course. Two awards will be given to novice divers to gain the fundamental knowledge, skills and ability to safely breathe underwater. The recipients must enroll in approved PADI diving courses/programs at a PADI training facility located closest to the home of the recipient. The training facility must send the invoice to WDHOF; funds are paid directly to the training facility, and not to the recipient.

NEW THIS YEAR!!!  WDHOF / MORGAN/O’NEILL UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHY GRANT
A $2,000 grant will be awarded to a qualified female photographer of any age to continue her professional development in the field of underwater photography. Applicants must be certified divers with significant dive experience. The successful applicant will be a serious, career-minded woman with the intent to (continue to) develop her career in underwater photography. Applicants will be required to submit a photographic portfolio and an essay. The grant may be used to fund master digital workshops or other developmental classes in underwater photography, and funds will be paid directly to the instructional facility—not to the recipient. The grant may not be used to buy equipment.

WDHOF / OCEAN PALS JUNIOR DIVE TRAINING GRANT
A $1,000 training grant (up to $500 for training and up to $500 for dive equipment) will be awarded to a deserving young woman, ages 13-16, who wishes to begin or further her dive education/training. Up to $500 may be used for dive training, and up to $500 may be used for dive equipment. The recipient MUST use the funds for training BEFORE she uses the award to purchase dive equipment. When the recipient enrolls in an approved diving course/program and purchases dive equipment, the training facility/equipment vendor must send the invoice to WDHOF; funds are paid directly to the training facility/vendor, and not to the recipient.

WDHOF / SCUBA MADE EASY TRAINING GRANT IN MARINE SCIENCE, OCEANOGRAPHY OR OCEAN ENGINEERING
A $1,000 training grant (up to $500 for training and up to $500 for dive equipment) will be awarded to a deserving woman diver of any age, working in the areas of marine science, oceanography or ocean engineering. The training grant is to be used for the purpose of continuing diver education/training and is open to candidates worldwide. The recipient MUST use the funds for training BEFORE she uses the award to purchase dive equipment. When the recipient enrolls in an approved diving course/program and purchases dive equipment, the training facility/equipment vendor must send the invoice to WDHOF; funds are paid directly to the training facility/vendor, and not to the recipient.

WDHOF / WOMEN’S SCUBA ASSOCIATION TRAINING GRANT sponsored by Jennifer King
A $750 training grant (up to $500 for training and up to $250 for dive equipment) will be awarded to a deserving young male or female who wishes to begin or further his/her dive education/training. Candidates must be enrolled in an ROTC or JROTC program, military academy or be a Sea Cadet. Up to $500 may be used for dive training, and up to $250 may be used for dive equipment. The recipient MUST use the funds for training BEFORE he/she uses the award to purchase dive equipment. When the recipient enrolls in an approved diving course/program and purchases dive equipment, the training facility/equipment vendor must send the invoice to WDHOF; funds are paid directly to the training facility/vendor, and not to the recipient.
 
 
How to apply: 
 
Information on all scholarships/grants and the online application can be found at http://www.wdhof.org/scholarships/scholarships.shtml

You may only apply for one scholarship/grant per year. Applicants MUST complete the online application form. Please read the scholarship/grant descriptions and application instructions carefully. All scholarships/grants require the applicant to submit a biography/resume/curriculum vitae, an essay, and two letters of recommendation. Some of the scholarships/training grants require additional information, or are for specific purposes. Incomplete and/or late applications will not be accepted for further consideration. If you have questions after you’ve carefully read the application instructions, please email: scholarships@wdhof.org
 
The deadline for receipt of applications is November 28, 2014 at midnight U.S. Eastern Standard Time. Applicants will be notified of award status by February 1, 2015. Only online submissions will be accepted.
 
To learn more about The Women Divers Hall of Fame, visit: www.wdhof.org

 

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Women Underwater – The Comprehensive Guide to Women in Scuba Diving, reaches out to women with specific information about their place in diving. With detailed guidance on equipment, medical issues and social factors, this book reaches women with inspiring stories from mentors who have forged a career in unique underwater fields. Authors Jill Heinerth and Renee Power tackle topics for both recreational and technical divers while featuring their vast experience in instruction, consulting and working in a field predominantly governed by men. At times humorous yet also deadly serious, the book answers delicate questions about hygiene, equipment fit and dealing with sexism. Printed in full color and generously illustrated, Women Underwater will be a welcome resource for any woman diver.

Women Underwater available now!