For the first time in history, fresh water has become a finite resource. Many experts agree that, without significant changes in water policy, wars of the 21st century may be fought, not over oil, but for control of clean water. We Are Water is an imaginative, entertaining, and enlightening documentary, illustrating the fragile relationship between our planet’s endangered fresh water resources, and the ever increasing needs of our expanding population.



  • Turn off water while brushing teeth – save 360 liters per week
  • Fix a dripping tap – save 300 gallons per year
  • Reduce shower form seven to four minutes – save 60 liters each time
  • Install low flow shower head – save 11 liters per minute, 750 gallons/month
  • Install dual flush toilet – save 50% each flush
  • Put a plug in basin while shaving – 9 liters per minute
  • Capture shower water for the garden
  • Flush less – save 2 to 7 gallons each time
  • Put a brick in the toilet tank – save a liter each flush
  • Turn off water while you shampoo and condition your hair – save 50 gallons a week Pee while you shower!


  • Turn off water while cleaning up the kitchen – save 100 gallons per week
  • Buy a water efficient dishwasher – save 50% each time
  • Only wash a full load of dishes – save 120 gallons per month
  • Use economy setting on dishwasher – save 4 liters
  • Compost instead of using your garbage disposal – save 9 liters per minute
  • Catch running water while it warms up
  • Plug the sink to rinse dishes or veggies
  • Defrost the night before instead of using running water 
  • Use a wash basin in sink, then recycle water to the garden
  • Fix a drip – save up to 75 liters a day
  • Save cold water in the fridge instead of running the tap
  • Become a part time vegetarian
  • Eat less meat Install a low flow faucet – save 50% of your water use
  • Buy WaterSense appliances
  • Use veggie rinse water on plants
  • Reuse the same drinking glass all day
  • Soak and scrape pots and pans rather than running water
  • Reuse veggie cooking water for tasty soup stock


  • Use a water efficient washing machine – save 30 gallons every load
  • Only wash a full load of laundry – saves 10 liters
  • Consider installing a grey water system to recycle laundry water
  • Pretreat stains so they only get washed once
  • But EnergyStar appliances
  • Use natural soap nuts instead of detergent
  • Attach a hose to your washing machine outlet pipe for use in the garden


  • Use old fish tank water on plants
  • Teach kids to turn off faucets properly
  • Reduce the distance from the water heater to the sink
  • Try on-demand water heaters for the shower or kitchen Insulate hot water pipes to retain heat
  • Look for EPA WaterSense labels
  • Drink tap water
  • Avoid putting medications in the toilet
  • Avoid putting chemicals in the toilet or down the sink
  • Don’t put fat and grease down the sink
  • Mix it with bird seeds and invite birds to your garden
  • Buy a used car. It takes 120,000 to make a new one
  • Reuse clothing. It takes 1800 gallons to make a pair of blue jean
  •  Drive less. It takes 70 gallons of water to produce one gallon of gas.
  • Give $15 to so someone in the developing world can have a clean water supply.
  • Ride your bicycle instead of driving.
  • Think before you buy. Is there something you can recycle or reuse?  


  • Irrigate early or late but not in the sunny part of the day
  • Avoid irrigating on windy days
  • Use less fertilizer
  • Create more shade in your yard to retain moisture in your plants and lawn
  • Use rain barrels
  • Eliminate herbicides
  • Pull weeds instead of using RoundUp
  • Replace part of the lawn with pebbles
  • Plants more shrubs Mulch and compost your garden
  • Use old blankets, carpet or cardboard in between crop rows for weed barriers
  • Group veggies in your garden by water needs
  • Mulch the garden to reduce evaporation – reduces watering 70%
  • Aerate and spike lawns in the spring for deep roots and drought tolerance
  • Check the pool for leaks – 500 liters per day
  • Cover the pool or hot tub (or just get rid of it)
  • Don’t trim the grass too short – longer needs less water
  • Plant drought resistant native plants
  • Direct rain gutters to plants that need it
  • Pee in the yard
  • Cover rain barrels
  • If you irrigate on a timer, install a rain shutoff
  • Pee in your compost pile
  • Direct the air conditioner drips to plants that need it
  • If you have to water, use drip irrigation
  • Check outdoor taps for leaks – save 1000 liters per year
  • Water the garden with a trigger nozzle not a sprinkler
  • Use a bucket and sponge to wash the car
  • Go to a car wash that reuses water
  • Wash your car on the lawn 
  • Collect rainwater for the garden
  • Sweep the driveway instead of hosing it down
  • Look for leaks – check water meter for two hours during no consumption period
  • Add walkway pavers and patio areas and let them runoff to garden
  • Plant more shrubs and ground cover to reduce the lawn
  • Water plants deeply but less often to improve drought tolerance
  • Learn where your master water shutoff valve is located
  • Let your lawn go dormant Wash the dog on the grass  


  • Report leaking taps and toilets to teachers – save 300 gallons
  • Nominate a water monitor to look for leaks
  • Put up posters to remind each other to turn off taps
  • Wash art supplies in a recycled ice cream container
  • Learn how to monitor the water meter
  • Ask your science teacher to help locate your watershed
  • Use less paper
  • Learn how to read a water meter


  • Wash dishes once at the end of the day
  • Appoint a daily dish washer
  • Upgrade to dual flush toilets
  • Talk about water conservation measures in staff meetings
  • Use less paper
  • Determine if there is a way to reuse water at your business
  • Conduct a water audit of your company
  • Use a refillable water bottle for drinking


  • Reuse hotel towels
  • Drink tap water if safe
  • Use a refillable water bottle

DRINK TAP WATER – Be an example for others. Disposable water bottles waster water and money. It takes 5 quarts to make one bottle of water and a quarter of a bottle of oil to make, transport and dispose of the water. Refill a water bottle and drink safe, clean tap water. You’ll save money.

REDUCE YOUR WATER FOOTPRINT – Click on this site: Water Footprint Calculator to learn about how much water is needed to support your lifestyle. The average American needs 1800 gallons of water per day, twice as much as the rest of the planet. This will help you reduce your use.

REDUCE, REUSE AND RECYCLE – Basic conservation helps save water. Turn off running taps. Shop at a thrift store. Stream movies. Download music instead of buying CDs. Shop at bulk stores with less packaging. Carry re-useable shopping bags.
EAT LOW ON THE FOOD CHAIN – Plant based nutrition requires less water than meat to bring to market. Consider being at least a part time vegetarian. A simple hamburger takes over 600 gallons to produce. Support your local farmer’s market.

THINK ABOUT THE WORLD BENEATH YOUR FEET – Everything you do on the surface of the land will be returned to you in drinking water. Dispose of things such as household chemicals and prescription drugs properly or you will be drinking them later.

Download cool activities for kids aged 7-14!


AI Robotic Cave Diver Mission a Success

By | All Posts, Cave Diving, Rebreather Diving, Underwater Photo and Video, We Are Water, Women Underwater | No Comments

In 1995, deep in a canyon in the Sierra Mazateca Mountains I sat around a campfire with Dr. Bill Stone. We were wrapping up a project in the Huautla Resurgence; a cave of mammoth proportions that we hoped would become the deepest cave on earth. With spring rains arriving early, we had experienced flooding in the canyon that was destroying the visibility of our cave. But Bill had an idea; a way to see in the dark. Two years later he had built the world’s first 3D mapping device that could accurately define the cave in three dimensions and even link it to surface topography with ultra low frequency radio beacons. The United States Deep Caving Team’s Wakulla2 Project was born.

I had the honor of driving the Wakulla mapping as a part of a team of 150 volunteers who worked together to create the first accurate 3D map of a subterranean system. It was cave diving history but also a leap forward in engineering and technology that was destined for far greater motives. Since that time Bill has further developed his devices, working with NASA on plans to send an autonomous mapper to Jupiter’s moon Europa where it can explore the ocean trapped beneath the frozen surface. He’s been hard at work in Alaska and Antarctica, diving in deep caves in Mexico and tinkering in the lab.

This week, a small but extremely capable version of his autonomous mapper made history at Wes Skiles Peacock Springs State Park in Florida. First hooked to a tether, engineers learned about the mapper’s behaviors, watched through its camera and tweaked software. Watching the robot navigate through real cave passages was remarkable. Finally, it was ready for the test. We unplugged the tether and watched the first robot cave diver explore and accurately map a submerged cave.

What’s next? There is still much to do to extend range and capability before Sunfish can be sent into the unknown to go where no person has been before, but the teamwork, professionalism and skill of Stone Aerospace engineers and volunteer cave divers has made a mark in the history of cave diving and artificial intelligence.

Jill Heinerth piloting the 3D mapper during the United States Deep Caving Team Wakulla2 project in 1998.

Bill Stone’s DepthX (DEep Phreatic THermal eXplorer) AUV.

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Resilience and Integrity

By | All Posts, Grenada, We Are Water | No Comments

Phil Saye was a happy man in the summer of 2004. He had a new dive shop, just five weeks old and a great home on Grenada. He was living the dream. But like many people in the Caribbean, there is life before Hurricane Ivan and life after. Ivan formed in early September, reached Category 5 strength on the Saffir-Simpson Scale, and became the 10th most intense Atlantic hurricane ever recorded. There was catastrophic damage on Grenada when it pummeled on shore as a strong Category 3. From there it devastated Cayman, western Cuba and even Alabama. But by that time, Phil Saye had nothing. His shop Dive Grenada was a shell and his home was destroyed. He was in shock. With nothing left, he only knew that others needed help too. Phil immediately volunteered for the Red Cross and assisted in every way he could. He comforted others and helped local people rebuild their lives. But just when things could not get worse, he fell and broke his hip. His first thought was that he would get back on his feet quickly, but soon learned that the entire head of the femur had snapped. He needed a hip replacement. Defeated and scared, he returned to England where medical care and rehabilitation was his only job. A remarkable women in his life, Helen stepped in and soon Phil was mobile and optimistic again. It was a love affair with his wife Helen and a love affair with Grenada that helped him rebuild and re-establish Dive Grenada as it is today.

So what has this got to do with diving? For me, everything. I dived with Phil on a Saturday, when his able staff could have easily given him a day off. Instead, he joined me on the boat for the sheer joy of diving. We went to the most trafficked site on the island, the Veronica L wreck and Happy Valley in the Marine Protection Area. I’m sure Phil has had more than hundreds of dives on these sites, but you could never wipe a grin off this man’s face. He loves his job. He loves his wife and he loves his team. That makes a day of diving something extraordinary.

Phil realizes that his customers are excited to dive with him. He says he can’t quite figure out why. After all, he has such a great staff. But for me, it is a special something. It’s his smile. It’s the fresh ginger cake and granola bars that he made for everyone on the boat. It’s a joie de vivre that Phil spills all over the boat. A day at Dive Grenada is transformational scuba. It doesn’t matter where you dive, you will come back new.

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Explorer in Residence

By | All Posts, Bell Island, Newfoundland, Cave Diving, Rebreather Diving, Sedna Expedition, Sidemount Diving, Underwater Photo and Video, We Are Water, Women Underwater | No Comments

In June 2016 I was named the first Explorer in Residence for the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. One of the major goals of the program will be to find funding that will enable school visits and online outreach to kids across Canada. I’ll be sharing the journey of exploration and encouraging kids to dream and discover their world. I’ll also be offering critical lessons about water literacy along the way. I created this video to support fundraising efforts in progress.

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Canadian Geographic Covers Women Explorers

By | All Posts, Bell Island, Newfoundland, Cave Diving, Rebreather Diving, Sedna Expedition, Sidemount Diving, Underwater Photo and Video, We Are Water, Women Underwater | No Comments

RCGScoverJill Heinerth graces the cover of this month’s Canadian Geographic Magazine. The edition hits newsstands July 4, 2016 and covers Canada’s Greatest Women Explorers. Jill Heinerth is featured as the new Explorer in Residence for the Royal Canadian Geographical Society.

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Projects of this nature take the hard work of volunteers, contributions from supporters and participation form people who are willing to carry the message. The following individuals and groups assisted in the creation of the We Are Water documentary film at the centerpiece of our mission.


  • Jill Heinerth
  • Robert McClellan


Xavier Fleuranceau


  • Dan’s Dive Shop
  • Great Lakes Technical Divers
  • Light Monkey
  • Renata Rojas


  • Christian Clark
  • Layne Fleuranceau
  • Brian Kakuk
  • Marc Laukien
  • Kristine & Murrey Olmsted
  • Tom Rae
  • Riana Treanor
  • Jan, Steve, Matt & Holly Jang
  • Bob and Mary Rabjohn
  • Gord, Kelley & Cori Rabjohn


  • Graham and Lila Maddocks
  • Martha McCullough
  • Barbara Wynns


  • Megan Cook
  • Stuart Grinde
  • Daniel Tomosovich


  • Carlos Fonseca
  • Annette and Mark Long
  • Matt Mandziuk
  • Ocean Support Foundation
  • John Sapp
  • Joseph Sferrazza
  • Triangle Diving, Bermuda


  • Aquatica
  • Kenny Broad
  • Captain Don’s Habitat
  • Jack Chalk
  • Alberta Underwater Council
  • G&S Watersports
  • Hollis
  • Brian Nadwidny
  • ORIS Watches
  • Santi
  • Scuba Diving Magazine
  • Perry Smith
  • Ursuit
  • VR Technology
  • Waterproof
  • Chris Wickman


  • Stephanie Benincasa
  • Carmine Benincasa
  • Chris Corfield
  • Alex Djermanovic
  • Natasa Djermanovic
  • Kevin Frillman
  • MichaelAngelo Gagliardi
  • Zelda Gagliardi
  • General Ecology
  • Randy Kliewer
  • Lora Laffan
  • Richard Moccia
  • Beth and Jerry Murphy
  • Ocean Quest Dive Center
  • Gene Page
  • Pacific Pro Dive
  • Wendy Quimby
  • Jason Sapp
  • Lana Taylor
  • Wendy Thurman


  • Aqua Sport Scuba
  • “Bear” Rae Olmsted
  • Dawn & April Bencze
  • Rich Best
  • Bird’s Underwater
  • Sharron Britton
  • John Buxton
  • Shannon and Ken Caraccia
  • John Cheeseman
  • Joel and Jacki Clark
  • Bill Coltart
  • Vlada Dekina
  • Delmont UMC
  • Dive Outpost
  • Luigi Di Raimo
  • JoAn & Derek Ferguson
  • Sam Gillis
  • Grant Graves
  • Richard Harris, MD
  • Adrian Hartley
  • Lee Ann Hughes
  • Eiko Jones
  • Larry Kalyniak, PhD
  • Marian Lane
  • Carol Lippincott
  • Cathy Lesh
  • John Minigan
  • Sharon Morgan
  • Bill and Tonya Nadeau
  • Niagara Divers Association
  • Lisa J Norelli, MD
  • Diana and Bill Oestreich
  • Renee Power
  • Luigi Di Raimo
  • Wendy J Richards
  • Jeff Rose
  • Stu Seldon
  • Dave Serafine
  • Sean Sexsmith
  • Suzanne Sferrazza
  • Jeff Shirk
  • Phil Short
  • Giovanni Soleti
  • Jim Stevenson
  • Sunken Treasure Scuba
  • Matthew Sypherd
  • Bonnie Toth
  • Wendy & Frank VanVliet
  • Lee Ann Waggener
  • Heidi Wallace
  • Jeanie Weimer
  • Tom Wilson
  • Cindy Wolff
  • Pam Wooten


  • Sara Calvin
  • Cuyler
  • Eric Deister
  • Jeffrey Fossmo
  • Dmitri Gorski
  • Emily Greer
  • Wendy Grossman
  • Keene Heywood
  • Rick Kilby
  • Rita Lemgruber
  • Ken Mayer
  • Janine McKinnon
  • W Roderick O’Connor
  • Chris Parker
  • Karen Peist
  • Jim “Robbo” Robinson
  • Gerald Sliker
  • Mark Stringer
  • Julianne Ziefle


  • Barbara Am Ende
  • Henrik Aronson
  • Kim Cavanaugh
  • Robert Cook
  • Kent Frazier
  • John Groff
  • John Hill
  • Robert H. Hughes
  • Jim Louvau
  • Jenn Macalady
  • Michael Myrick
  • Robert Osborne
  • Brian Rossman
  • Peter & Nancy Williams
  • Michael & Jennifer Wyman


  • Marco Alvarez
  • Ronald Apple
  • Chris Clark
  • Jason Cook
  • Richard Dreher
  • Lesley Gamble
  • Matthew Harris
  • Gal Haspel
  • John Moran
  • Lance and Jessica Nelson
  • Luke & Ben Nelson
  • Matthew Pence
  • Janet Schmidt
  • Mary Slusarchuk
  • Christopher Stonestreet
  • Daphne Haspel Soares


  • Tzur Haspel Soares
  • Catherine Maddocks