FREE VIDEO TRAINING TIPS FROM JILL

How to Run a Line Into The Cave

Command Hand Signals

PRISM2 CCR Skills

Cave Diving Hand Signals

Florida Cave Diving Preview

Shearwater Petrel HUD

REBREATHER CLASSES

Jill actively teaches the Prism2 rebreather. Private rebreather orientations are also available for divers who need guidance and in-water experience before purchasing a rebreather.

SIDEMOUNT TRAINING

Whether you use sidemount configuration in a cave or open water, Jill can tailor a program that teaches critical safety skills and a offers a completely customized fit of a new sidemount unit.

PHOTO/VIDEO TRAINING

Custom video and photography classes and internships are offered on a private basis.

CAVE DIVING TRAINING

Over twenty years of experience teaching divers to safely work in the overhead environment. Cave diving programs are taught through RAID, NSS-CDS, PADI and IANTD in open circuit backmount or sidemount configurations as well as specific rebreathers in CCR Cave classes.

TRAINING BOOKS

CAVE STUDENTS

Equipment

  • Mask – Low volume recommended (easier to clear). Also suggest mask strap be Velcro/neoprene, which reduce entanglement risk. A backup mask is not required but recommend to have at least one backup per three-person team.
  • Fins – suitable for cave diving (broader and shorter than most standard sport-diving fins) with buoyancy characteristics appropriate for keeping feet up and to prevent silting. Fin straps must not hang loose and straps or buckles should be taped to prevent likelihood of creating a line snag.
  • Exposure Protection – suitable for local cave diving environment, but we do recommend a hood to help protect scalp from rock ceiling.
  • Tanks – Double cylinders with isolation manifold or sidemount cylinders are both acceptable. Tanks should be similar in capacity to those in use by rest of team. (N.B. Gas matching requires the tanks containing the least volume of gas will be the controlling volume for the whole team.)
  • Regulators – two independent properly serviced regulators each with a first and second stage. If diving backmount then one should be equipped with an SPG, if diving sidemount then both tanks to be equipped with SPGs. At least one regulator LP hose must be at least 2 meters/7 feet long to facilitate easy gas sharing in single file or through a restriction
  • Harness – a harness and buoyancy cell with sufficient lift capacity to float diver and gear and gas at the start of the dive. If the tank size and exposure protection warrants, backup buoyancy must be carried.
  • Instrumentation – two multi-gas capable personal dive computers, with fully-charged batteries.
  • Lighting – one primary dive light with appropriate hand mount to facilitate running reel with light. Expected burn time of primary light should exceed the planned full day’s dive time. At least two backup lights of a suitable burn time each to accommodate minimum burn time of expected dive.
  • Primary Reel – One primary reel per dive team of a suitable length to facilitate reaching the permanent guideline in local caves (typically 125m/400 feet)
  • Safety Reel – At least one safety reel/spool per diver with a length appropriate for finding a lost diver or guideline in local caves (typically 45m/150 feet). It is recommended that an additional short safety spool is carried
  • Additional Jump Reels/Spools – as required to make jumps for complex navigation dives.
  • Notes – Underwater slate, wrist slate or “wet notes” with at least one working pencil
  • Cutting Devices – Two line cutting tools with at least one accessible by either hand
  • Emergency Oxygen – One emergency oxygen cylinder with regulator available on site per team (Jill will have this on site)
  • Decompression Tank – On dives where decompression is involved, each student will have one oxygen rated decompression tank with regulator and SPG
  • Gas Analyzer – A minimum of one nitrox gas analyzer per team (Jill will have one and dive shops provide these locally)
  • Markers – At least personally labeled 3 directional and 3 non-directional line markers secured in such a way to permit easy deployment and prevent accidental loss
  • Helmet – optional for general cave diving and mandatory for DPV use

Other Gear to Bring

Oxygen Analyzers are available at all dive shops.
Helium analyzers are available at all dive shops.
General tools are available to use at all dive shops.
Sunscreen, bug repellent (summer) are often needed.
Bring sturdy shoes for walking to dive sites.
A roll up mat is handy for dressing as most sites are very sandy.
A tarp for the back of your car or plastic tub to keep things clean can be useful.

Required Paperwork

You are required to bring certification cards, log books, proof of DAN or equivalent diving insurance, and all original paperwork signed for class. A signed medical from your doctor is required prior to any water training. DON’T FORGET IT! Any remaining tuition fees are payable by PayPal, check in USD, cash or traveler’s checks on the first day of class.

Reading Materials

You are required to use the NSS-CDS Cave Diving Workbook which is available in all local dive shops. It is recommend to read “The Essentials of Cave Diving” by Jill Heinerth. Other great reference materials include: The Darkness Beckons, Blueprint to Survival, The NSS-CDS Cave Manual, Blind Descent and Caverns Measureless to Man.

Dive Site Conditions

There are literally dozens of diving locations within a one-hour drive of High Springs, Florida. It is the “Mecca” for cave divers attracting new and experienced divers from all around the world. Groundwater is a consistent 72°F / 21°C all year round. Many local divers wear dry suits all year in order to comfortably manage long decompression times. The average depth of cave training sites is 60-100 feet (20-30m). Some sites are commercially operated and charge up to $40 daily entry for diving. Other sites are part of the Florida State Park system. These sites charge under $5 per day for divers. Popular sites for training include Ginnie Springs, Little River, Peacock Springs State Park, Manatee Springs and Madison Blue Springs State Park.

There is no predictable “good or bad” time to come to north Florida. From time to time, heavy spring rains have been known to flood the region and bring us “too much” water for cave diving. At these times, the caves reverse and tannic red river water flows in. In addition to lack of visibility and dangerous siphons, the parks are sometimes submerged during floods. Hurricanes can bring a similar effect, with hurricane season stretching from May 15 to November. Many years will pass without direct influences from hurricanes. Our last significant hurricane year was 2005.

State Parks have strict operating hours that must be adhered to. They generally close at sunset, but have “last dive” start times posted at the front gate. You will be asked to provide proof of certification at parks and commercial operations. Bring certification cards that support the type of diving you wish to do. Use of DPVs in caves is forbidden in many parks and requires proof of certification in others. Bring your c-card or you may be turned away.

Weather and Climate

Florida climate is pleasant, but if you are visiting in the winter, we experience 15 to 20 nights of freezing temperatures. Be prepared for cold nights and warm days. Conversely, the summer heat can be extreme. Night temps are comfortable but humidity can make day temps stifling. In all cases the most pleasant temperatures are in the water! Bring solid shoes for walking your gear to the water. Sun protection is essential year round. Most local divers wear hats and gloves on a chilly winter morning and quickly discard them by lunchtime.

Dive Shops

Local Diving Services

North Florida is one of the best serviced technical diving regions in the world. There are five major dive manufacturers in close range of Ginnie Springs. Dive Rite, Light Monkey, Halcyon, NACD, NSS-CDS and GUE all operate their world headquarters in the area. You can get great prices and selection on almost any technical diving gear you might want or need. Fill stations serve up gas by the cubic foot at reasonable prices and high pressures. Some fill stations operate with limited hours, so plan your dives to access fills during open hours.

Dive Shops – Listed from East to West in Cave Country:

Steve Gamble Scuba
If your dry suit is leaking or needs a set of pockets, Steve is likely the world’s busiest and best dry suit repair facility. He’s a half hour from High Springs but also takes gear shipped from out of town for repair.
6911 NW 22nd Street, Unit A,
Gainesville, Fl 32653
352-379-0653

www.gamblescuba.com

Cave Country Dive Shop
Across the street from the High Springs Country Inn in High Springs. Full service dive facility from recreational through technical, with all types of fills including trimix. CCR friendly. Can order and ship PADI/DSAT materials for you. Long term storage lockers are available in air conditioned space.
705 NW Santa Fe Blvd.
High Springs, Fl 386-454-4444

www.CaveCountryDiveShop.com

Extreme Exposure
Sharing a building with GUE world headquarters, the shop is a full service dive facility from recreational through technical. Some storage is available for divers leaving gear.
25 S Main Street
High Springs, FL, 32643
386-454-8158

info@extreme-exposure.com

Amigos Dive Center
The dive shop is disguised in a North Florida trailer, so it is easy to miss, but it is perhaps the most unique store on the planet. The operations and fills are available 24/7. After instruction, divers are permitted to fill their own tanks and register their sales in the computer. Tabs are paid in person or by PayPal at the end of your stay. All equipment and rentals are provided on the honor system. The shop has frequent events including bluegrass barbecues and socials. Divers may leave their tanks at Amigos in exchange for their ability to rent them out.
Owner: Wayne Kinard
5472 SW Elim Church Rd
Ft. White, FL 32038 – 386-497-3876

www.amigosdivecenter.com

Dive Outpost
The Dive Outpost has a lot of history in cave country. Just outside the town of Luraville, it is the closest fill station to Wes Skiles Peacock Springs State Park. Cathy offers bunk house and cabin lodging and real North Florida hospitality in addition to full dive shop services.
20148 180th Street,
Live Oak, Florida 32060
386-776-1449 – Owner: Cathy Lesh

cathy@diveoutpost.com

Cave Excursions
Right around the corner from Wes Skiles Peacock Springs State Park, this shop has everything for a technical diver. Enormous fill capacity and an annual Party/Sale (The REACT Party in October) makes it a unique and convenient shop. They also have several mobile home/trailers available for rent.
20338 180th Trace
Live Oak, FL 32060 – 386.776.2299

Bill or Linda: rennaker@sidemount.com

Fills are also available on site at Ginnie Springs, but they only offer straight air at high pressure. All other fill stations offer the full selection of premixed nitrox, custom blends, trimix and oxygen.
Dive shops are also available in the city of Gainesville for people who are searching for a unique brand or spare part.

Lodging

The High Springs Country Inn
This is the most popular dive motel in the area. Very inexpensive and close to good food options. http://www.highspringscountryinn.com
Phone: 386-454-1565

Cadillac Motel
405 Northwest Santa Fe Blvd.
High Springs, FL 32643-9372
www.highspringscadillacmotel.com
Phone: 386-454-1701

Dive Outpost Rentals
Cabin facilities at fill station and dive shop. Accommodates 12 people in three separate buildings. Located adjacent to Peacock Springs.
Cathy Lesh 386-776-1449 www.diveoutpost.com

Cave Excursion Rentals
Two miles from Peacock Springs near local fill stations. Five trailer homes to rent.
386-776-2299

Rum House
Very inexpensive lodging near High Springs. Singles or up to 4 people in trailer home. www.cavediveflorida.com

Hydro Lodge High Springs
www.hydrolodge.com
(386) 965-5832

Shared Housing
www.AmigosDiveCenter.com
Representing many local group rental options for divers.

Where to Eat

High Springs is home to two world class restaurants in The Great Outdoors and 60 North Main. The Springs Diner, Alice’s Parkside and the Station Bakery are also favorites. You can pick up a pizza at the corner of First and Main and there is a Winn Dixie grocery store on Hwy. 441 on the northwest side of town.

Once you drift away from High Springs, you may find it harder to find things that are served “fried in a basket.” It is advisable to pack a healthy lunch and bring it with you to class to prevent a time-consuming search for healthy food options.

Other Things To Do

Swim with the manatees
If you are visiting between November and April, it is worth scheduling a visit to Crystal River to swim with the manatees. It is one of the most remarkable experiences you will ever have with wildlife. I recommend contacting Bill and Diane at www.BirdsUnderwater.com for reservations. Take the first boat of the day to be in the water at dawn. Manatees are just waking up and are congregated in a small area. Later in the day invites more tourists and the manatees swim off to forage through the river.
Walk with gators
Payne’s Prairie State Park is an ancient sinkhole recharge basin on the south side of Gainesville. Thousands of alligators gather in the natural setting. You can walk safely on a trail and view them in Alachua Sink and canals without the obstruction of fences.
Marianna Florida Caves
3 hours from High Springs is another region that is rich in accessible caves and supported by a good diving infrastructure. Cave Adventurers Dive Shop offers full dive services, lodging and boats.
Orlando
If you are visiting with family, they may be interested in theme parks and shopping in Orlando. Foreign visitors find the prices of goods to be very inexpensive.

Map

Download cave location map. cave_map

REBREATHER STUDENTS

Equipment

  • Approved rebreather (no mods from original design)
  • Appropriate bailout bottle(s) with regulators, one with a two meter / seven foot hose for air sharing and SPG.
  • Harness
  • BCD (redundant BCD recommended for wet suit divers but not required)
  • Dive computer (single gas, single gas enriched air, multigas) and back up or back up timer and depth gauge and back up decompression information. These can be built into rebreather or worn separately.
  • Appropriate exposure suit
  • Reel(s) – at least one primary reel/spool per diver
  • DSMB
  • Cutting device
  • Slate(s) with pencil or notebook with pencil
  • Mask & Fins
  • Cave diving equipment for CCR Cave candidates

Other Gear to Bring

Oxygen Analyzers are available at all dive shops.
Helium analyzers are available at all dive shops.
General tools are available to use at all dive shops.
Sunscreen, bug repellent (summer) are often needed.
Bring sturdy shoes for walking to dive sites.
A roll up mat is handy for dressing as most sites are very sandy.
A tarp for the back of your car or plastic tub to keep things clean can be useful.
Sorb is available in local dive shops and some sensors are available locally.

Required Paperwork

You are required to bring certification cards, log books, proof of DAN or equivalent diving insurance, and all original paperwork signed for class. A signed medical from your doctor is required prior to any water training. DON’T FORGET IT! Any remaining tuition fees are payable by PayPal, check in USD, cash or traveler’s checks on the first day of class.

Reading Materials

You are required to use the appropriate student kit for your class and agency. It is recommended to read, The Basics of Rebreather Diving by Jill Heinerth. You are required to bring a copy of your rebreather instructional manual and all appropriate checklists for your unit.

For Explorer students – go to this page – and click on the Explorer Video tab on the right hand side of the page and watch all video segments.

For PRISM2 divers – you have an option to sign up for the PRISM2 Online Preparation Class here for $39.95.

Dive Site Conditions

There are literally dozens of diving locations within a one-hour drive of High Springs, Florida. It is the “Mecca” for cave divers attracting new and experienced divers from all around the world. Groundwater is a consistent 72°F / 21°C all year round. Many local divers wear dry suits all year in order to comfortably manage long decompression times. The average depth of cave training sites is 60-100 feet (20-30m). Some sites are commercially operated and charge up to $40 daily entry for diving. Other sites are part of the Florida State Park system. These sites charge under $5 per day for divers. Popular sites for training include Ginnie Springs, Little River, Peacock Springs State Park, Manatee Springs and Madison Blue Springs State Park.

There is no predictable “good or bad” time to come to north Florida. From time to time, heavy spring rains have been known to flood the region and bring us “too much” water for cave diving. At these times, the caves reverse and tannic red river water flows in. In addition to lack of visibility and dangerous siphons, the parks are sometimes submerged during floods. Hurricanes can bring a similar effect, with hurricane season stretching from May 15 to November. Many years will pass without direct influences from hurricanes. Our last significant hurricane year was 2005.

State Parks have strict operating hours that must be adhered to. They generally close at sunset, but have “last dive” start times posted at the front gate. You will be asked to provide proof of certification at parks and commercial operations. Bring certification cards that support the type of diving you wish to do. Use of DPVs in caves is forbidden in many parks and requires proof of certification in others. Bring your c-card or you may be turned away.

Weather and Climate

Florida climate is pleasant, but if you are visiting in the winter, we experience 15 to 20 nights of freezing temperatures. Be prepared for cold nights and warm days. Conversely, the summer heat can be extreme. Night temps are comfortable but humidity can make day temps stifling. In all cases the most pleasant temperatures are in the water! Bring solid shoes for walking your gear to the water. Sun protection is essential year round. Most local divers wear hats and gloves on a chilly winter morning and quickly discard them by lunchtime.

Dive Shops

Local Diving Services

North Florida is one of the best serviced technical diving regions in the world. There are five major dive manufacturers in close range of Ginnie Springs. Dive Rite, Light Monkey, Halcyon, NACD, NSS-CDS and GUE all operate their world headquarters in the area. You can get great prices and selection on almost any technical diving gear you might want or need. Fill stations serve up gas by the cubic foot at reasonable prices and high pressures. Some fill stations operate with limited hours, so plan your dives to access fills during open hours.

Dive Shops – Listed from East to West in Cave Country:

Steve Gamble Scuba
If your dry suit is leaking or needs a set of pockets, Steve is likely the world’s busiest and best dry suit repair facility. He’s a half hour from High Springs but also takes gear shipped from out of town for repair.
6911 NW 22nd Street, Unit A,
Gainesville, Fl 32653
352-379-0653

www.gamblescuba.com

Cave Country Dive Shop
Across the street from the High Springs Country Inn in High Springs. Full service dive facility from recreational through technical, with all types of fills including trimix. CCR friendly. Can order and ship PADI/DSAT materials for you. Long term storage lockers are available in air conditioned space.
705 NW Santa Fe Blvd.
High Springs, Fl 386-454-4444

www.CaveCountryDiveShop.com

Extreme Exposure
Sharing a building with GUE world headquarters, the shop is a full service dive facility from recreational through technical. Some storage is available for divers leaving gear.
25 S Main Street
High Springs, FL, 32643
386-454-8158

info@extreme-exposure.com

Amigos Dive Center
The dive shop is disguised in a North Florida trailer, so it is easy to miss, but it is perhaps the most unique store on the planet. The operations and fills are available 24/7. After instruction, divers are permitted to fill their own tanks and register their sales in the computer. Tabs are paid in person or by PayPal at the end of your stay. All equipment and rentals are provided on the honor system. The shop has frequent events including bluegrass barbecues and socials. Divers may leave their tanks at Amigos in exchange for their ability to rent them out.
Owner: Wayne Kinard
5472 SW Elim Church Rd
Ft. White, FL 32038 – 386-497-3876

www.amigosdivecenter.com

Dive Outpost
The Dive Outpost has a lot of history in cave country. Just outside the town of Luraville, it is the closest fill station to Wes Skiles Peacock Springs State Park. Cathy offers bunk house and cabin lodging and real North Florida hospitality in addition to full dive shop services.
20148 180th Street,
Live Oak, Florida 32060
386-776-1449 – Owner: Cathy Lesh

cathy@diveoutpost.com

Cave Excursions
Right around the corner from Wes Skiles Peacock Springs State Park, this shop has everything for a technical diver. Enormous fill capacity and an annual Party/Sale (The REACT Party in October) makes it a unique and convenient shop. They also have several mobile home/trailers available for rent.
20338 180th Trace
Live Oak, FL 32060 – 386.776.2299

Bill or Linda: rennaker@sidemount.com

Fills are also available on site at Ginnie Springs, but they only offer straight air at high pressure. All other fill stations offer the full selection of premixed nitrox, custom blends, trimix and oxygen.
Dive shops are also available in the city of Gainesville for people who are searching for a unique brand or spare part.

Lodging

The High Springs Country Inn
This is the most popular dive motel in the area. Very inexpensive and close to good food options. http://www.highspringscountryinn.com
Phone: 386-454-1565

Cadillac Motel
405 Northwest Santa Fe Blvd.
High Springs, FL 32643-9372
www.highspringscadillacmotel.com
Phone: 386-454-1701

Dive Outpost Rentals
Cabin facilities at fill station and dive shop. Accommodates 12 people in three separate buildings. Located adjacent to Peacock Springs.
Cathy Lesh 386-776-1449 www.diveoutpost.com

Cave Excursion Rentals
Two miles from Peacock Springs near local fill stations. Five trailer homes to rent.
386-776-2299

Rum House
Very inexpensive lodging near High Springs. Singles or up to 4 people in trailer home. www.cavediveflorida.com

Hydro Lodge High Springs
www.hydrolodge.com
(386) 965-5832

Shared Housing
www.AmigosDiveCenter.com
Representing many local group rental options for divers.

Where to Eat

High Springs is home to two world class restaurants in The Great Outdoors and 60 North Main. The Springs Diner, Alice’s Parkside and the Station Bakery are also favorites. You can pick up a pizza at the corner of First and Main and there is a Winn Dixie grocery store on Hwy. 441 on the northwest side of town.

Once you drift away from High Springs, you may find it harder to find things that are served “fried in a basket.” It is advisable to pack a healthy lunch and bring it with you to class to prevent a time-consuming search for healthy food options.

Other Things To Do

Swim with the manatees
If you are visiting between November and April, it is worth scheduling a visit to Crystal River to swim with the manatees. It is one of the most remarkable experiences you will ever have with wildlife. I recommend contacting Bill and Diane at www.BirdsUnderwater.com for reservations. Take the first boat of the day to be in the water at dawn. Manatees are just waking up and are congregated in a small area. Later in the day invites more tourists and the manatees swim off to forage through the river.
Walk with gators
Payne’s Prairie State Park is an ancient sinkhole recharge basin on the south side of Gainesville. Thousands of alligators gather in the natural setting. You can walk safely on a trail and view them in Alachua Sink and canals without the obstruction of fences.
Marianna Florida Caves
3 hours from High Springs is another region that is rich in accessible caves and supported by a good diving infrastructure. Cave Adventurers Dive Shop offers full dive services, lodging and boats.
Orlando
If you are visiting with family, they may be interested in theme parks and shopping in Orlando. Foreign visitors find the prices of goods to be very inexpensive.

Map

Download cave location map. cave_map

SIDEMOUNT STUDENTS

Equipment

  • Approved sidemount unit with adequate lift
  • Appropriate tanks with regulators, one with a two meter / seven foot hose for air sharing and both with SPGs and inflator(s)
  • Appropriate tank bands for connection to harness
  • Redundant wing capability recommended for wet suit divers but not required
  • Dive computer (single gas, single gas enriched air, multigas) and back up or back up timer and depth gauge and back up decompression information
  • Appropriate exposure suit
  • Reel(s) – at least one primary reel/spool per diver
  • DSMB
  • Cutting device
  • Slate(s) with pencil or notebook with pencil
  • Mask & Fins
  • Cave diving equipment for Cave Sidemount candidates
  • Stage bottles if participating in Tech Sidemount Class
  • Optional helmet

Other Gear to Bring

Oxygen Analyzers are available at all dive shops.
Helium analyzers are available at all dive shops.
General tools are available to use at all dive shops.
Sunscreen, bug repellent (summer) are often needed.
Bring sturdy shoes for walking to dive sites.
A roll up mat is handy for dressing as most sites are very sandy.
A tarp for the back of your car or plastic tub to keep things clean can be useful.
Sorb is available in local dive shops and some sensors are available locally.

Required Paperwork

You are required to bring certification cards, log books, proof of DAN or equivalent diving insurance, and all original paperwork signed for class. A signed medical from your doctor is required prior to any water training. DON’T FORGET IT! Any remaining tuition fees are payable by PayPal, check in USD, cash or traveler’s checks on the first day of class.

Reading Materials

You are required to use the appropriate student kit for your class and agency if one is available. It is recommended to read Side Mount Profiles by Brian Kakuk and Jill Heinerth. A Sidemount Diving DVD fundamentals video is also available for viewing.

Dive Site Conditions

There are literally dozens of diving locations within a one-hour drive of High Springs, Florida. It is the “Mecca” for cave divers attracting new and experienced divers from all around the world. Groundwater is a consistent 72°F / 21°C all year round. Many local divers wear dry suits all year in order to comfortably manage long decompression times. The average depth of cave training sites is 60-100 feet (20-30m). Some sites are commercially operated and charge up to $40 daily entry for diving. Other sites are part of the Florida State Park system. These sites charge under $5 per day for divers. Popular sites for training include Ginnie Springs, Little River, Peacock Springs State Park, Manatee Springs and Madison Blue Springs State Park.

There is no predictable “good or bad” time to come to north Florida. From time to time, heavy spring rains have been known to flood the region and bring us “too much” water for cave diving. At these times, the caves reverse and tannic red river water flows in. In addition to lack of visibility and dangerous siphons, the parks are sometimes submerged during floods. Hurricanes can bring a similar effect, with hurricane season stretching from May 15 to November. Many years will pass without direct influences from hurricanes. Our last significant hurricane year was 2005.

State Parks have strict operating hours that must be adhered to. They generally close at sunset, but have “last dive” start times posted at the front gate. You will be asked to provide proof of certification at parks and commercial operations. Bring certification cards that support the type of diving you wish to do. Use of DPVs in caves is forbidden in many parks and requires proof of certification in others. Bring your c-card or you may be turned away.

Weather and Climate

Florida climate is pleasant, but if you are visiting in the winter, we experience 15 to 20 nights of freezing temperatures. Be prepared for cold nights and warm days. Conversely, the summer heat can be extreme. Night temps are comfortable but humidity can make day temps stifling. In all cases the most pleasant temperatures are in the water! Bring solid shoes for walking your gear to the water. Sun protection is essential year round. Most local divers wear hats and gloves on a chilly winter morning and quickly discard them by lunchtime.

Dive Shops

Local Diving Services

North Florida is one of the best serviced technical diving regions in the world. There are five major dive manufacturers in close range of Ginnie Springs. Dive Rite, Light Monkey, Halcyon, NACD, NSS-CDS and GUE all operate their world headquarters in the area. You can get great prices and selection on almost any technical diving gear you might want or need. Fill stations serve up gas by the cubic foot at reasonable prices and high pressures. Some fill stations operate with limited hours, so plan your dives to access fills during open hours.

Dive Shops – Listed from East to West in Cave Country:

Steve Gamble Scuba
If your dry suit is leaking or needs a set of pockets, Steve is likely the world’s busiest and best dry suit repair facility. He’s a half hour from High Springs but also takes gear shipped from out of town for repair.
6911 NW 22nd Street, Unit A,
Gainesville, Fl 32653
352-379-0653

www.gamblescuba.com

Cave Country Dive Shop
Across the street from the High Springs Country Inn in High Springs. Full service dive facility from recreational through technical, with all types of fills including trimix. CCR friendly. Can order and ship PADI/DSAT materials for you. Long term storage lockers are available in air conditioned space.
705 NW Santa Fe Blvd.
High Springs, Fl 386-454-4444

www.CaveCountryDiveShop.com

Extreme Exposure
Sharing a building with GUE world headquarters, the shop is a full service dive facility from recreational through technical. Some storage is available for divers leaving gear.
25 S Main Street
High Springs, FL, 32643
386-454-8158

info@extreme-exposure.com

Amigos Dive Center
The dive shop is disguised in a North Florida trailer, so it is easy to miss, but it is perhaps the most unique store on the planet. The operations and fills are available 24/7. After instruction, divers are permitted to fill their own tanks and register their sales in the computer. Tabs are paid in person or by PayPal at the end of your stay. All equipment and rentals are provided on the honor system. The shop has frequent events including bluegrass barbecues and socials. Divers may leave their tanks at Amigos in exchange for their ability to rent them out.
Owner: Wayne Kinard
5472 SW Elim Church Rd
Ft. White, FL 32038 – 386-497-3876

www.amigosdivecenter.com

Dive Outpost
The Dive Outpost has a lot of history in cave country. Just outside the town of Luraville, it is the closest fill station to Wes Skiles Peacock Springs State Park. Cathy offers bunk house and cabin lodging and real North Florida hospitality in addition to full dive shop services.
20148 180th Street,
Live Oak, Florida 32060
386-776-1449 – Owner: Cathy Lesh

cathy@diveoutpost.com

Cave Excursions
Right around the corner from Wes Skiles Peacock Springs State Park, this shop has everything for a technical diver. Enormous fill capacity and an annual Party/Sale (The REACT Party in October) makes it a unique and convenient shop. They also have several mobile home/trailers available for rent.
20338 180th Trace
Live Oak, FL 32060 – 386.776.2299

Bill or Linda: rennaker@sidemount.com

Fills are also available on site at Ginnie Springs, but they only offer straight air at high pressure. All other fill stations offer the full selection of premixed nitrox, custom blends, trimix and oxygen.
Dive shops are also available in the city of Gainesville for people who are searching for a unique brand or spare part.

Lodging

The High Springs Country Inn
This is the most popular dive motel in the area. Very inexpensive and close to good food options. http://www.highspringscountryinn.com
Phone: 386-454-1565

Cadillac Motel
405 Northwest Santa Fe Blvd.
High Springs, FL 32643-9372
www.highspringscadillacmotel.com
Phone: 386-454-1701

Dive Outpost Rentals
Cabin facilities at fill station and dive shop. Accommodates 12 people in three separate buildings. Located adjacent to Peacock Springs.
Cathy Lesh 386-776-1449 www.diveoutpost.com

Cave Excursion Rentals
Two miles from Peacock Springs near local fill stations. Five trailer homes to rent.
386-776-2299

Rum House
Very inexpensive lodging near High Springs. Singles or up to 4 people in trailer home. www.cavediveflorida.com

Hydro Lodge High Springs
www.hydrolodge.com
(386) 965-5832

Shared Housing
www.AmigosDiveCenter.com
Representing many local group rental options for divers.

Where to Eat

High Springs is home to two world class restaurants in The Great Outdoors and 60 North Main. The Springs Diner, Alice’s Parkside and the Station Bakery are also favorites. You can pick up a pizza at the corner of First and Main and there is a Winn Dixie grocery store on Hwy. 441 on the northwest side of town.

Once you drift away from High Springs, you may find it harder to find things that are served “fried in a basket.” It is advisable to pack a healthy lunch and bring it with you to class to prevent a time-consuming search for healthy food options.

Other Things To Do

Swim with the manatees
If you are visiting between November and April, it is worth scheduling a visit to Crystal River to swim with the manatees. It is one of the most remarkable experiences you will ever have with wildlife. I recommend contacting Bill and Diane at www.BirdsUnderwater.com for reservations. Take the first boat of the day to be in the water at dawn. Manatees are just waking up and are congregated in a small area. Later in the day invites more tourists and the manatees swim off to forage through the river.
Walk with gators
Payne’s Prairie State Park is an ancient sinkhole recharge basin on the south side of Gainesville. Thousands of alligators gather in the natural setting. You can walk safely on a trail and view them in Alachua Sink and canals without the obstruction of fences.
Marianna Florida Caves
3 hours from High Springs is another region that is rich in accessible caves and supported by a good diving infrastructure. Cave Adventurers Dive Shop offers full dive services, lodging and boats.
Orlando
If you are visiting with family, they may be interested in theme parks and shopping in Orlando. Foreign visitors find the prices of goods to be very inexpensive.

Map

Download site location map. cave_map