Tag

icebergs

Humpback High Five

By | All Posts, Bell Island, Newfoundland, Sedna Expedition, Underwater Photo and Video, We Are Water, Women Underwater | No Comments
When Humpbacks Hit

Snorkeling with humpbacks can be challenging. They are here in Newfoundland feeding voraciously on a buffet of capelin. There are literally schools of millions of fish that the whales gently scoop up to fill their bellies. Visibility can be challenging, but we floated quietly for over five hours in the chilly water, bouncing in the growing seas. The humpbacks became curious for a short while and swam by us, sometimes turning around and catching us in a wake of bubbles created by their crashing tails. The repetitive behavior was entrancing and fun. On one pass, a pair of whales dropped their load, dowsing Cas and I in a cloud of endless, murky whale shit. The capelin went after it… cannibalism I suppose! Some of the whales rolled and showed us their bellies, flapping their flippers in a slow pass. But when a humpback gets too close, their tail slap is a wake up call. We were incredibly privileged to share the water with these amazing creatures.

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Icebergs are Moody

By | All Posts, Sedna Expedition, Underwater Photo and Video, We Are Water, Women Underwater | No Comments
Icebergs Make Their Own Weather

Icebergs are temperamental. They make their own weather and effuse a moodiness underwater that is visceral. The approach to a small berg is done cautiously. In the waning days of their lives, they are petulant. They calve and roll with unexpectedness. The create unique down-currents as the fresh water pours off the melting mass. They emit a dense fog along their girdle and fizz as they dissolve in the warmer air temperatures. Underwater, they can be a cacophony of noise. Cracks and bumps are punctuated with thuds so loud that they shake the core of your soul. As the first person to ever dive inside an iceberg cave in Antarctica, I have witnessed calving that sealed my entrance, currents that pinned me down and the complete destruction of a 4 square mile iceberg I had just emerged from. I am paranoid around icebergs. My partner Cas Dobbin and I approached slowly with Debbie Stanley and Luc Michel. Rick ran the Zodiac, offering strict instructions not to surface by the berg but to swim back away on the safe side before coming up. We planned a short 30 minute peek to check it out. Halfway in to our dive, a deafening thud reverberated through my body as the berg slammed the sea floor pounding everything on it into a pulp. Debbie, a wise veteran of icebergs headed for the boat. She had seen it all in the past and wasn’t going to push fate. We skirted along the edge of deco to reserve enough conservatism to emerge at any time. Safely aboard the boat, we were jubilant. Cas had completed his first iceberg dive for his 32nd birthday!

Want to join me to dive icebergs, historic shipwrecks and swim with whales? I’ll be back July 7-15, 2015 here at Ocean Quest Adventures. Contact holly@oceanquestnl.com to join me or drop me a note on my contact form for more information.

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Icebergs

By | All Posts, Bell Island, Newfoundland, Sedna Expedition, Underwater Photo and Video, We Are Water, Women Underwater | No Comments
Icebergs Make Their Own Weather

Icebergs are temperamental. They make their own weather and effuse a moodiness underwater that is visceral. The approach to a small berg is done cautiously. In the waning days of their lives, they are petulant. They calve and roll with unexpectedness. The create unique down-currents as the fresh water pours off the melting mass. They emit a dense fog along their girdle and fizz as they dissolve in the warmer air temperatures. Underwater, they can be a cacophony of noise. Cracks and bumps are punctuated with thuds so loud that they shake the core of your soul.

As the first person to ever dive inside an iceberg cave in Antarctica, I have witnessed calving that sealed my entrance, currents that pinned me down and the complete destruction of a 4 square mile iceberg I had just emerged from. I am paranoid around icebergs.

My partner Cas Dobbin and I approached slowly with Debbie Stanley and Luc Michel. Rick ran the Zodiac, offering strict instructions not to surface by the berg but to swim back away on the safe side before coming up. We planned a short 30 minute peek to check it out. Halfway in to our dive, a deafening thud reverberated through my body as the berg slammed the sea floor pounding everything on it into a pulp. Debbie, a wise veteran of icebergs headed for the boat. She had seen it all in the past and wasn’t going to push fate.

We skirted along the edge of deco to reserve enough conservatism to emerge at any time. Safely aboard the boat, we were jubilant. Cas had completed his first iceberg dive for his 32nd birthday!

Want to join me to dive icebergs, historic shipwrecks and swim with whales? I’ll be back July7-15 here at Ocean Quest Adventures. Contact Holly@OceanQuestAdventures.com to join me or drop me a note on my contact form for more information.

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Redbull Visits with Jill

By | All Posts, Cave Diving, Rebreather Diving, Sedna Expedition, We Are Water, Women Underwater | No Comments

Journalist Tarquin Cooper interviews Jill for Redbull. WakullaJillMapper

Diving inside underwater caves would be most people’s idea of hell. For Jill Heinerth, it’s heaven.

Canadian underwater explorer Jill Heinerth has dived in some of the most extreme locations on planet earth, from underwater caves to icebergs in the frigid waters off Antarctica. But she’s not in it for the kicks but to bring back valuable knowledge of our fresh water systems. See images and read more.