EXPEDITION GRENADA

#ExpeditionGrenada

Join explorer Jill Heinerth and PodDiver Radio guru Joe Cocozza as we explore the adventurous side of Grenada and Carriacou. We’ll sample fine diving and enjoy the culinary treats of the Spice Islands. If you want an insider’s guide to visiting this beautiful Caribbean paradise, stay tuned here on this site. 
Listen to PodDiver Radio journeys with us, follow #ExpeditionGrenada and meet us at trade shows around the world!

GRENADA IS FOODIES HEAVEN

Umbrellas Beach Bar
Right beside Eco Divers, this restaurant has a great view overlooking the beach.
Slipway
Quaint yachters hangout with a taste of history and interesting local tastes.
Gallery Café
Lovely gallery of local artisans coupled with simple food made with love.
Patti’s Deli
Yacht provisioning and tasty take out gourmet food shop conveniently located on Main Street in Hillsborough.
Calabash Beach Club
Exquisite tapas and small treats in a relaxed beach setting right beside ScubaTech Grenada.
Coyaba
Casual poolside dining or dressy formal fares mix with the gentle sounds of birds and peeping tree frogs.
Lazy Turtle
Great place to try out fresh lionfish on a pizza or sauteed in garlic butter with capers.
Green Roof Inn
Family owned cozy atmosphere.
Victory Bar at Port Louis Marina
Beautiful marina setting with exquisite local specialities.
Savvys at Mount Cinnamon Resort
An unmatched staff and stellar chef with live local sounds.

Eco Dive Shop

Eco Dive Shop

Join Marine Biologists

Arawak Divers

Arawak Divers

Wild Carriacou

Native Spirit Scuba

Native Spirit Scuba

Local owned

Aquanauts Dive Shop

Aquanauts Dive Shop

Rec to tec

Lumba Dive

Lumba Dive

Relax and learn

Deefer Diving

Deefer Diving

Try voluntourism

ScubaTech Grenada

ScubaTech Grenada

Tec & CCR

Dive Grenada

Dive Grenada

Small groups

Resilience and Integrity

By | All Posts, Grenada, We Are Water | No Comments

Phil Saye was a happy man in the summer of 2004. He had a new dive shop, just five weeks old and a great home on Grenada. He was living the dream. But like many people in the Caribbean, there is life before Hurricane Ivan and life after. Ivan formed in early September, reached Category 5 strength on the Saffir-Simpson Scale, and became the 10th most intense Atlantic hurricane ever recorded. There was catastrophic damage on Grenada when it pummeled on shore as a strong Category 3. From there it devastated Cayman, western Cuba and even Alabama. But by that time, Phil Saye had nothing. His shop Dive Grenada was a shell and his home was destroyed. He was in shock. With nothing left, he only knew that others needed help too. Phil immediately volunteered for the Red Cross and assisted in every way he could. He comforted others and helped local people rebuild their lives. But just when things could not get worse, he fell and broke his hip. His first thought was that he would get back on his feet quickly, but soon learned that the entire head of the femur had snapped. He needed a hip replacement. Defeated and scared, he returned to England where medical care and rehabilitation was his only job. A remarkable women in his life, Helen stepped in and soon Phil was mobile and optimistic again. It was a love affair with his wife Helen and a love affair with Grenada that helped him rebuild and re-establish Dive Grenada as it is today.

So what has this got to do with diving? For me, everything. I dived with Phil on a Saturday, when his able staff could have easily given him a day off. Instead, he joined me on the boat for the sheer joy of diving. We went to the most trafficked site on the island, the Veronica L wreck and Happy Valley in the Marine Protection Area. I’m sure Phil has had more than hundreds of dives on these sites, but you could never wipe a grin off this man’s face. He loves his job. He loves his wife and he loves his team. That makes a day of diving something extraordinary.

Phil realizes that his customers are excited to dive with him. He says he can’t quite figure out why. After all, he has such a great staff. But for me, it is a special something. It’s his smile. It’s the fresh ginger cake and granola bars that he made for everyone on the boat. It’s a joie de vivre that Phil spills all over the boat. A day at Dive Grenada is transformational scuba. It doesn’t matter where you dive, you will come back new.

Share Button

Native Spirit Scuba Grenada

By | All Posts, Grenada | No Comments

Adrian Blackman had a lengthy career in the diving industry before he finally opened his own diving company Native Spirit Scuba Grenada. Located on Grand Anse Beach at the Radisson Resort, it is the first diving operation owned and operated by Grenadian native citizens. The vibe is relaxed and quality excellent. They take safety and preparation seriously and carefully prepare us for a fast drop to the Hema, a wreck that Adrian watched sink more than a decade ago. A member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary, Blackman responded to the sinking and rescued the crew members from the ship. As they boarded his vessel, they heard a deafening crack. The ship broke in half on descent. Today it sits well offshore in the clear, current rich diversity of the Atlantic. Sharks hide in the lee of the wreck and large schools of fish constantly carpet the surroundings. A pair of eagle rays drifted over our heads as we descended quickly to the bottom.

Our second stop was a beautiful reef site where I carefully observed Coral Reef Gardener Paulina seeking out and noting the tiny inhabitants of the reef. Her role, sponsored by an EU NGO, helps her develop and maintain a coral nursery and also monitor reef health and trends. Now 20 years old, she is seeking further education and a career involving marine biology. A confident and graceful diver, she is a joy to watch as she hovers effortlessly over little holes containing lobsters crabs and reef fish.

Joe and I both enjoyed the relaxed atmosphere of Native Spirit Scuba and truly appreciated hte expert boat handling and diving procedures.

Share Button

Tech Diving with Aquanauts

By | All Posts, Grenada, Rebreather Diving | No Comments

Peter Seupel from Aquanauts Grenada prepares his rebreather on the bench of one of his well appointed  Newton dive boats. As he and his partner near completion of their gear, he beckons one of his surface support team to the back of the boat. “Get the rebreather checklist,” he asks the young man. Immediately, I feel comforted, noting that he is a diligent role model when it comes to technical diving. The staff member reads off a series of prompts and each diver double checks critical components. I often get a sense of a diving operation from the very first interaction. When an operator asks for my certification card and walks me through their liability forms, then I know that they care about the details. I know that nobody is exempt from the culture of safety. Seeing the owner including himself in that procedure tells me we are going to have a very good day!

We drop onto the BiancaC and quickly descend to her stern to photograph the large propeller. This is a drift dive, so we don’t need to worry about returning in the rather stiff current. We follow Peter to view a large hole in the side of the hull and masts that now lay on the sea floor. The visibility isn’t stellar today, but the BiancaC never disappoints. Her hull is a mosaic of color and texture and you could certainly spend hours just sitting in one place.

Our second dive of the day is on another wreck, the Shakem. We’ve heard that many divers find this to be their favorite site and we’re glad to have a bit more time on this shallower wreck.  Schools of butterfly fish and creole wrasse trickle down like rain and I am pursued by a small school that has found an affinity with my feet. The top of the wreck is covered with a red coral that is sprouting white blossoms that look like snow flakes. The intact wreck is in view from stem to stern. Is this visibility is lower than usual, I can’t imagine a perfect day!

When we return to the boat, Joe is sporting the biggest grin of the week. A wreck diver at heart, he gets excited about getting a little rust on his suit.

Share Button
Share Button