All Posts By

Jill Heinerth

A World Without Ice

By | Arctic, Royal Canadian Geographical Society, We Are Water | No Comments
Have you ever wondered what our world would look like without ice?

The video assembled by Business Insider is based on the 2013 National Geographic story, “What the World Would Look Like if All the Ice Melted.” It shows a model that represents a sea level rise of 216 feet.

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Just Getting There

By | All Posts, Arctic | No Comments

It is a journey just to begin an expedition and it requires the help of a lot of people. Staging equipment can be monumental in and of itself. In order to conduct diving activities in Southeast Bylot Island, Nunavut, a lot of logistics came together. Arctic Kingdom has already staged a camp on the edge of the ice floe. They have also shipped a compressor and tanks to the camp and all the equipment we will need for support from food to shelter. Canadian North and Nunavut Tourism have sponsored an airline ticket to reach Pond Inlet. I am extremely grateful for their generous assistance. Here is what the journey looks like so far:

2451 km – High Springs, Florida to Fergus, Ontario – Driving camera and scuba equipmentCANNO Logo - Airlines_FC

541 km – Fergus to Ottawa, Ontario – Driving to meet first flight

2100 km – Ottawa, Ontario to Iqaluit, Nunavut – Flight leg one

796 km – Iqaluit to Hall Beach, Nunavut – Flight leg two

71 km – Hall Beach to Igloolik, Nunavut – Flight leg three

395 km – Igloolik to Pond Inlet – Flight leg four

70 km – Pond Inlet to Southeast Bylot Island – Qamutik traditional sled to ice edge

Total distance traveled: 6424 km

For someone who usually travels underground, that is almost exactly the distance to the center of the earth!

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The Importance of Sea Ice

By | Arctic, We Are Water | No Comments

aBerg2757sThe extent of the cover of sea ice at both poles keeps reaching new records. According to NASA, the Arctic sea ice reached a record low wintertime extent on March 7, 2017. It was the same situation on the other side of the world when Antarctic sea ice levels were documented to reach its lowest extent recorded since satellites began to measure these parameters in 1979. What is even more troubling is that what remains is even thinner than before. Sea ice plays many roles in the health of our planet. When sea ice melts, nutrients are released into the water stimulating the growth of phytoplankton in the summer. These microorganisms play a role as the base of the food web upon which everything else must feed. When too much sea ice melts and disappears, we lose a large white reflective base that would usually send light back into space. With larger expanses of dark open water, more heat is absorbed and the overall temperature of the planet increases.

A Place of Great Change

The Arctic is transforming more rapidly than anywhere else on our planet. Temperatures there are rising at twice the rate seen elsewhere. Many scientists agree that the Arctic could soon be ice-free. Extreme changes are in motion for the people of the North. Permafrost melting, sea level rise, erosion and an increase in stormy weather pose risks for a society that has lived in balance with nature. With the Arctic food web shifting from loss of sea ice, traditional hunts are disrupted, and the tenuous balance of food security is lost.

With the Arctic becoming more navigable and accessible, resource speculation is on the rise. Oil and gas and shipping industries are jockeying into position to snag new routes and drilling rights in the open water. These activities will indelibly change the complexion of the Arctic and bring new risks to an otherwise pristine sanctuary.

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How to Stay Calm Under Pressure

By | All Posts, Arctic, Cave Diving, Rebreather Diving, Royal Canadian Geographical Society, Underwater Photo and Video, We Are Water, Women Underwater | No Comments

While speaking at the Vancouver Aquarium, I took a moment to speak to CBC Radio about how to deal with fear. I’ve used this to stay alive in underwater caves, but these lessons will serve you any time your worst nightmares come true. Read and listen here.

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Penguin Random House Canada Announces Multi-Book Deal with Aquanaut Jill Heinerth

By | All Posts, Arctic, Cave Diving, Rebreather Diving, Royal Canadian Geographical Society, Sidemount Diving, Underwater Photo and Video, We Are Water, Women Underwater | No Comments

May 4, 2017. Toronto, Canada –Penguin Random House Canada is proud to announce the signing of a four-book deal with renowned underwater explorer Jill Heinerth. The first of two adult titles, Into the Planet, is scheduled for publication by Doubleday Canada in Fall of 2018. The first of two children’s books with Tundra Books will follow in 2019. Literary agent Rick Broadhead of Rick Broadhead & Associates completed the deal.

More people have walked on the moon than have been to some of the remote places Jill Heinerth has explored on earth. Jill is a veteran of over twenty years of scientific diving, filming/photography and exploration, and her expeditions include the first dives inside Antarctica icebergs and record-breaking scientific missions in deep underwater caves around the world.

“As soon as I began reading Jill Heinerth’s story, I was completely drawn into her world. With courage, persistence, and drive, she goes deep under the surface of Earth to places that few have been before. Into the Planet promises to be illuminating and transporting; an unforgettable story about determination, focus, and facing down moments of danger. Doubleday Canada is hugely excited and honoured to bring Jill’s stories to readers,” says Amy Black, Publisher of Doubleday Canada.

Jill Heinerth’s children’s books will celebrate a strong female role model in a traditionally male-dominated field. The first book will be an autobiographical picture book based on Heinerth’s extraordinary diving experiences and the second a non-fiction picture book that explores themes of environmental preservation and the awe-inspiring world of underwater exploration.

“Jill is an exceptional individual and role model for children, especially girls, in a time when we need to empower young women. Her cave-diving brings together so many different aspects of science, history, cultural and environmental studies, not to mention creative thinking and character education. Tundra Books is delighted to share Jill’s riveting stories with young readers,” says Tara Walker, Publisher of Penguin Random House Canada Young Readers.

“I’m absolutely thrilled to have found a home for my stories with Penguin Random House Canada. Working with the editorial staff at Doubleday and Tundra is an absolute dream. Their passion for these projects will undoubtedly help me reach a wide and diverse audience with captivating and inspirational narratives,” says Heinerth.

Jill Heinerth has worked on projects with National Geographic, NOAA and television networks worldwide. In recognition of her lifetime achievement, Jill was appointed as the first Explorer-in-Residence for the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. Jill is a Fellow of The Explorers Club and a member of Women Diver’s Hall of Fame. Later this year, Jill will be honored with the most prestigious award in diving from the Academy of Underwater Arts & Sciences.

For speaking engagement requests related to the book visit www.speakers.ca/speakers/jill-heinerth/. For more info about Jill Heinerth: http://www.intotheplanet.com/

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Oxygen Measurement for Divers

By | All Posts, Cave Diving, Rebreather Diving, Women Underwater | No Comments

LambBookSadly, much of our information about oxygen sensors has been born on Internet chat forums. A lot of that banter is simple anecdotal evidence as opposed to scientific fact. Thankfully, owner of Vandagraph Ltd. in the UK, John Lamb has released his 2nd Edition of “Oxygen Measurement for Divers.” It might not be your idea of a book to curl up with in front of a fire, but it is one of the best investments you can make as a rebreather diver or owner of an oxygen analyzer. Lamb carefully breaks down the measurement of oxygen into abundantly illustrated chapters covering everything from gas laws to blending methods. He dispels some of the misinformation about sensor life and current limitation behavior and offers best management practices for storage and use of common sensors. He reveals the Achilles Heels of sensors and describes future technologies that will improve the measurement of gases in the future. If you want to break through the mire of misinformation and be better informed about diving safety, this is a must-read book.

One of the most important safety practices that Lamb suggests is to replace sensors 12-18 months after manufacture (not after their first use). He describes the normal expected life of a sensor is about 9-10 months in pure oxygen at the surface. He notes that single failure rates are low and multiple failures are rare when these parameters are adhered to. He also advises that correct storage procedures must be adhered to. In his examination of sensors, he believes that temperature is the main cause of early sensor failure. For most divers this means that sensors should be replaced every dive season. For me, that means putting a simple alert in my iPhone Calendar. It is a simple act that can ensure that you are reading accurate PO2 in your rebreather.

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Weston Foundation sends Jill Heinerth to Winnipeg’s Bairdmore School

By | All Posts, Royal Canadian Geographical Society, Underwater Photo and Video, We Are Water, Women Underwater | No Comments

With the support of the Weston Foundation, Jill Heinerth visited Bairdmore School in Winnipeg to talk about exploration and science. Jill is on a cross-Canada speaking tour as the Royal Canadian Geographical Society’s Explorer in Residence. She shares a multimedia presentation about science and new career opportunities and works with small groups of kids on specific skills such as photography, career planning and research opportunities. Jill encourages kids to use discovery learning in their lives and teaches them that failure can have many unforeseen benefits for discovery and learning. She talks about risk assessment, fear, discovery and exploration in the context of geographic education.

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Weston Foundation Supports School Speaking Tour

By | All Posts, Royal Canadian Geographical Society, We Are Water | No Comments

The Weston Foundation in cooperation with the Royal Canadian Geographical Society is sending Jill Heinerth to schools across Canada. This week, the RCGS Explorer in Residence visited with kids in Saskatoon at Fairhaven School and Holliston Schools to talk about exploration, geography and future career opportunities. Kids were totally engaged in the presentation and were eager to ask questions about fear, underwater science and challenging gender norms. A small group of kids got a special treat, learning how to operate Jill’s professional cameras and spending the day as photo-journalists.

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National Geographic Recognizes Jill Heinerth’s Edgy Photography

By | All Posts, Arctic, Royal Canadian Geographical Society, Underwater Photo and Video, We Are Water, Women Underwater | No Comments

National Geographic Photo Editor Sadie Quarrier recently recognized 9 remarkable women for their skills as adventure photographers.

For female adventure photographers, it can also be a challenge to break into this male-dominated niche.”

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Royal Canadian Geographical Society School Visits in Central Canada

By | All Posts, Royal Canadian Geographical Society, We Are Water | No Comments

Jill Heinerth was visiting Calgary to speak to school kids about exploration and geography. Students at Alice Jamieson Girls Academy, Stanley Jones School, Dr. Martha Cohen School and New Brighton School had a chance to meet Jill and hear her multimedia presentation about exploration and science. She met with small groups to coach interested kids in topics including journalism, photography, career planning, fear, failure and discovery learning.

Jill’s talks are made possible through support from the Weston Foundation.